The Guide to Making Your Home Work for an Elderly Relative4 minute read

4 minute read

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Updated for December, 2018

The aging of American Baby Boomers, a generation now numbering approximately 75 million, is expected to have an enormous impact on American society. An estimated three million individuals will turn 65 every year for the next two decades or so. For the most part, Baby Boomers are healthier, wealthier and more active than previous generations. However, retirement in the traditional sense may not be part of the plan for many of these healthy, active seniors.

Asian Mom in wheelchair gardening with daughter

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Table of Contents

Even though Baby Boomers may be in better physical condition than their predecessors, aging takes a toll on physical well-being, with mobility and vision problems causing the most concern.

There is no denying that society is changing on a global scale as more and more individuals live longer.

While previous generations of empty nesters may have looked forward to retirement communities and lives of leisure, the current crop of seniors is more likely to continue working, taking “aging in place” in stride. Even though Baby Boomers may be in better physical condition than their predecessors, aging takes a toll on physical well-being, with mobility and vision problems causing the most concern.

The option for an increasing number of families today is sharing, whether it stems from need or preference. There are many factors at play. Grown children often remain at home or return home; single parents frequently share homes with their own parents. Changes in the structure, size and makeup of American households requires taking a new look at architecture and design that will address the needs of various age groups, from toddler to senior citizen.